Union Bay Gets Screwed

I love using screws on my projects, the most common are the Robertson wood screw. For those neophytes that’s the screw with the square head.

After badly cutting his hand while using a slot-headed screwdriver, Peter Lymburner Robertson invented the square-headed screwdriver and screw in 1908. He received the Canadian patent for his invention in 1909. … The Robertson screw was a big hit!

I use the Philips screw for drywall work, the screw has a star pattern. The Phillips head screwdriver was created and patented by Henry Phillips in the 1930s and was originally used on the 1936 Cadillac. The great thing about it is that unlike the flat head screw (with a single ridge at its tip to slide into a screw with one slot), the Phillips screwdriver is self-centering. Its “X” design won’t slip out of the X-slotted screw. Instead, it grips the screw firmly in the center, provided it’s the suitable size for the screw.

Now the slotted screw, this is the original screw drive. You find these everywhere, though the practice of using screws with slotted drives is on the decline because the screwdriver slips out of the slot, particularly when you are applying heavy torque to really tighten down (or loosen, for that matter) these types of screws.

And finally theTorx (pronounced /tɔːrks/), developed in 1967 by Camcar Textron, is the trademark for a type of screw head characterized by a 6-point star-shaped pattern. A popular generic name for the drive is star, as in star screwdriver or star bits. … Torx screws are also becoming increasingly popular in construction industries. This was explained in the first video comparing Robertson to Torx.

Now in Union Bay we have trustees that are much like these wood screws, they all come with their own uniqueness. Four male threads screw to the right (Righty Tightly) but one trustee was different she was a bolt with a left-hand thread. They all think what they say is important and want individual attention but like the all wood screws they need to understand their purpose.

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